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BMC Pregnancy Childbirth. 2013;13 Suppl 1:S5. doi: 10.1186/1471-2393-13-S1-S5. Epub 2013 Jan 31.

Comparing CenteringPregnancy® to standard prenatal care plus prenatal education.

Author information

1
Department of Paediatrics, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta, Canada.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

There is significant evidence to support the importance of prenatal care in preventing adverse outcomes such as preterm birth and low infant birth weight. Previous studies have indicated that the benefits of prenatal care are not evenly distributed throughout the social strata. In addition, emerging evidence suggests that among particular populations, rates of preterm birth are unchanged or increasing. This suggests that an alternate care model is necessary, one that seeks to addresses some of the myriad of social factors that also contribute to adverse birth outcomes. In previous studies, the group prenatal care model CenteringPregnancy® had been shown to reduce adverse birth outcomes, but to date, no comparison had been made with a model that included prenatal education. This study sought to investigate whether any significant difference remained within the comparison groups when both models accounted for social factors.

METHODS:

This analysis was based on survey data collected from a prospective cohort of pregnant women through the All Our Babies Study in Calgary, Alberta.

RESULTS:

At baseline, there were significant differences between the comparison groups in their psychosocial health, with the women in the CenteringPregnancy® group scoring higher levels of depressive symptoms, stress and anxiety. At four months postpartum, the differences between the groups were no longer significant.

CONCLUSIONS:

These results suggest that CenteringPregnancy® can recruit and retain a demographically vulnerable group of women with a constellation of risk factors for poor pregnancy and birth outcomes, including poverty, language barriers and poor mental health. Post program, the rates of stress, anxiety and depression were similar to other women with more social and financial advantage. These findings suggest that CenteringPregnancy® may be a community based care strategy that contributes to improved mental health, knowledge, and behaviours to optimize outcomes for mothers and children.

PMID:
23445830
PMCID:
PMC3561159
DOI:
10.1186/1471-2393-13-S1-S5
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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