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J Strength Cond Res. 2013 Dec;27(12):3310-21. doi: 10.1519/JSC.0b013e31828de8c3.

Effects on strength, power, and flexibility in adolescents of nonperiodized vs. daily nonlinear periodized weight training.

Author information

1
1Physical Education Postgraduation Program, Rio de Janeiro Federal University, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil; 2Laboratory of Exercise Physiology and Morphofunctional Assessment, Granbery Methodist College, and Morphofunctional Assessmen Juiz de Fora, Brazil; and 3Health, Exercise Science, and Sport Management, University of Wisconsin-Parkside, Kenosha, Wisconsin.

Abstract

The aim of this study was to compare 2 models of resistance training (RT) programs, nonperiodized (NP) training and daily nonlinear periodized (DNLP) training, on strength, power, and flexibility in untrained adolescents. Thirty-eight untrained male adolescents were randomly assigned to 1 of 3 groups: a control group, NP RT program, and DNLP program. The subjects were tested pretraining and after 4, 8, and 12 weeks for 1 repetition maximum (1RM) resistances in the bench press and 45° leg press, sit and reach test, countermovement vertical jump (CMVJ), and standing long jump (SLJ). Both training groups performed the same sequence of exercises 3 times a week for a total of 36 sessions. The NP RT consisted of 3 sets of 10-12RM throughout the training period. The DNLP training consisted of 3 sets using different training intensities for each of the 3 training sessions per week. The total volume of the training programs was not significantly different. Both the NP and DNLP groups exhibited a significant increase in the 1RM for the bench press and 45° leg press posttraining compared with that pretraining, but there were no significant differences between groups (p ≤ 0.05). The DNLP group's 1RM changes showed greater percentage improvements and effect sizes. Training intensity for the bench press and 45° leg press did not significantly change during the training. In the CMVJ and SLJ tests, NP and DNLP training showed no significant change. The DNLP group showed a significant increase in the sit and reach test after 8 and 12 weeks of training compared with pretraining; this did not occur with NP training. In summary, in untrained adolescents during a 12-week training period, a DNLP program can be used to elicit similar and possible superior maximal strength and flexibility gains compared with an NP multiset training model.

PMID:
23442273
DOI:
10.1519/JSC.0b013e31828de8c3
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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