Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Patient Educ Couns. 2013 Jul;92(1):74-80. doi: 10.1016/j.pec.2013.01.019. Epub 2013 Feb 22.

Medication information seeking behavior of patients who use multiple medicines: how does it affect adherence?

Author information

1
Faculty of Pharmacy, The University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW, Australia. scar4376@uni.sydney.edu.au

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

This article explores medication information seeking behavior (MISB). We aimed to develop a scale for measuring MISB and use it to explore the relationships between MISB, adherence and factors, which drive information seeking.

METHODS:

Patients (N=910) using multiple medicines completed questionnaires. Exploratory and confirmatory factor analyses were performed. Correlations and multivariate analyses were used to investigate the relationships between variables.

RESULTS:

Respondents sought medication information mainly from health professionals and written medicines information. The medication information seeking behavior scale (MISB) had acceptable reliability and validity. Information seeking was most intense among respondents who had recent changes in their medicine regimen and worries about their medicines. Those who sought medication information from autonomous sources were more likely to be non-adherent than those who never did (OR=2.00 [1.48, 2.70]). Seeking information from health professionals had no influence on adherence.

CONCLUSION:

Health practitioners should carefully attend to patients' questions about medicines information. When patients mention that they are worried about their medicines and have sought medication information from television, magazines, brochures or family and friends, this could be a sign that they tend towards non-adherent behavior.

PRACTICE IMPLICATIONS:

The MISB scale could be used to learn more about patients' use of medication information.

PMID:
23433733
DOI:
10.1016/j.pec.2013.01.019
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Elsevier Science
Loading ...
Support Center