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J Immigr Minor Health. 2014 Aug;16(4):613-21. doi: 10.1007/s10903-013-9798-4.

Disparities in mammography rate among immigrant and native-born women in the U.S.: progress and challenges.

Author information

1
Department of Health Policy and Administration, The Pennsylvania State University, 604 Ford Building, University Park, PA, 16802, USA, ayao@psu.edu.

Abstract

Disproportionately low mammography rates among U.S. immigrants have been of persistent concern. In light of policies to increase access to screening, this study identifies differences in factors associated with screening among immigrant and native-born women in 2000 and 2008. Data from immigrant and native-born women aged 40+ years in the 2000 and 2008 National Health Interview Surveys were included in descriptive and multivariate regression analyses. Mammography rates rose from 60.2 to 65.5 % among immigrant women, remaining lower than the 68.9 % rate among native-born in 2008. Among immigrants, short length of residency and lower education were associated with lower screening rates in 2000 but not in 2008, while public insurance coverage was positively associated with screening only in 2008. In contrast to immigrants, among the native-born education and income were associated with mammography receipt in 2008, and in both groups health care access was associated with greater screening rates. Policy initiatives aimed at increasing access to mammography may be positively affecting immigrant screening disparities. Access to primary care and public insurance coverage are likely to be very important in maintaining and furthering improvements in mammography rates.

PMID:
23430466
PMCID:
PMC3772964
DOI:
10.1007/s10903-013-9798-4
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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