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Int J Chron Obstruct Pulmon Dis. 2013;8:97-104. doi: 10.2147/COPD.S40885. Epub 2013 Feb 15.

Supplemental vitamin D and physical performance in COPD: a pilot randomized trial.

Author information

1
University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN, USA.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Low 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25[OH]D) levels, commonly observed in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), are associated with muscle weakness in elderly populations, and vitamin D supplementation appears to improve muscle strength and decrease falls in older individuals. We tested the effect of vitamin D supplementation on physical performance in patients with COPD.

METHODS:

Patients were randomized to daily cholecalciferol (2000 IU) or placebo for 6 weeks. The primary outcome was the 6-week change in Short Physical Performance Battery (SPPB) score. Secondary outcomes included changes in the St George's Respiratory Questionnaire (SGRQ) score, and serum 25(OH)D.

RESULTS:

Thirty-six participants (mean age 68 years, all Caucasian males, mean forced expiratory volume in one second 33% of predicted) completed the study. Despite an increase in 25(OH)D levels in the intervention arm to a mean of 32.6 ng/mL (versus 22.1 ng/mL in the placebo arm), there was no difference in improvements in either SPPB scores (0.3 point difference; 95% confidence interval -0.8 to 1.5; P = 0.56) or SGRQ scores (2.3 point difference; 95% confidence interval -2.3 to 6.9; P = 0.32).

CONCLUSION:

Among patients with severe COPD, 2000 IU of daily vitamin D for 6 weeks increased 25(OH)D to a level widely considered as normal. However, compared with placebo, short-term vitamin D supplementation had no discernible effect on a simple measure of physical performance.

KEYWORDS:

chronic obstructive pulmonary disease; randomized controlled trial; skeletal muscle strength; vitamin D

PMID:
23430315
PMCID:
PMC3575124
DOI:
10.2147/COPD.S40885
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
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