Format

Send to

Choose Destination
See comment in PubMed Commons below
Nat Protoc. 2013 Mar;8(3):555-67. doi: 10.1038/nprot.nprot.2013.021. Epub 2013 Feb 21.

Building a morbidostat: an automated continuous-culture device for studying bacterial drug resistance under dynamically sustained drug inhibition.

Author information

1
Department of Systems Biology, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, USA. erdaltoprak@sabanciuniv.edu

Abstract

We present a protocol for building and operating an automated fluidic system for continuous culture that we call the 'morbidostat'. The morbidostat is used to follow the evolution of microbial drug resistance in real time. Instead of exposing bacteria to predetermined drug environments, the morbidostat constantly measures the growth rates of evolving microbial populations and dynamically adjusts drug concentrations inside culture vials in order to maintain a constant drug-induced inhibition. The growth rate measurements are done using an optical detection system that is based on measuring the intensity of back-scattered light from bacterial cells suspended in the liquid culture. The morbidostat can additionally be used as a chemostat or a turbidostat. The whole system can be built from readily available components within 2-3 weeks by biologists with some electronics experience or engineers familiar with basic microbiology.

PMID:
23429717
PMCID:
PMC3708598
DOI:
10.1038/nprot.nprot.2013.021
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Full text links

    Icon for Nature Publishing Group Icon for PubMed Central
    Loading ...
    Support Center