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Neurology. 2013 Mar 5;80(10):904-10. doi: 10.1212/WNL.0b013e3182840c84. Epub 2013 Feb 20.

Total antioxidant capacity of the diet and major neurologic outcomes in older adults.

Author information

1
Department of Epidemiology, Erasmus Medical Center, Rotterdam, The Netherlands. nheed@channing.harvard.edu

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To evaluate total antioxidant capacity of the diet, measured by the ferric-reducing antioxidant power (FRAP) assay, in relation to risks of dementia and stroke, as well as key structural brain volumes, in the elderly.

METHODS:

We prospectively studied 5,395 participants in the Rotterdam Study, aged 55 years and older, who were dementia free and provided dietary information at study baseline; 5,285 individuals were also stroke free at baseline, and 462 were dementia and stroke free at the time of an MRI brain scan 5 years after baseline. Dietary data were ascertained using a semiquantitative food-frequency questionnaire, and combined with food-specific FRAP measurements from published tables; this information was aggregated across the diet to obtain "dietary FRAP scores." Multivariable-adjusted Cox proportional hazard models were used to estimate relative risks of dementia and stroke, and multivariable-adjusted linear regression was used to estimate mean differences in structural brain volumes, across tertiles of dietary FRAP scores.

RESULTS:

During a median 13.8 years of follow-up, we identified approximately 600 cases each of dementia and stroke. In multivariable-adjusted models, we observed no associations between dietary FRAP scores and risk of dementia (p trend = 0.3; relative risk = 1.12, 95% confidence interval = 0.91-1.38, comparing the highest vs lowest FRAP tertiles) or risk of stroke (p trend = 0.3; relative risk = 0.91, 95% confidence interval = 0.75-1.11, comparing extreme FRAP tertiles); results were similar across subtypes of these outcomes. Dietary FRAP scores were unrelated to brain tissue volumes as well.

CONCLUSIONS:

Total antioxidant capacity of the diet, measured by dietary FRAP scores, does not seem to predict risks of major neurologic diseases.

PMID:
23427318
PMCID:
PMC3653208
DOI:
10.1212/WNL.0b013e3182840c84
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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