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Chin Med J (Engl). 2013 Feb;126(3):421-5.

Endovenous laser ablation of great saphenous vein with ultrasound-guided perivenous tumescence: early and midterm results.

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1
Department of Vascular Surgery, Renji Hospital, School of Medicine, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200127, China.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Endovenous laser ablation (EVLA) is an improved method to treat varicose great saphenous veins (GSV) with a high satisfactory rate. This study aimed to evaluate the efficiency and safety of treatment by EVLA procedures with ultrasound-guided perivenous tumescence.

METHODS:

Thirty-one patients (31 limbs) with symptomatic varicose vein primary to chronic venous insufficiency (CVI) treated with EVLA were prospectively studied. The entire procedure was performed under ultrasound-guided tumescent local anesthesia. The patients were evaluated with a 18 month follow-up postoperation using clinical examination and venous duplex ultrasonography. Pain scores and quality of life (QOL) were recorded using visual analog scale (VAS) and the chronic venous insufficiency questionnaire (CIVIQ) at 1 week, 1 month, and 12 months after operation.

RESULTS:

All patients tolerated EVLA procedure well. The overall success occlusion rates of GSV were 92%, 94%, and 94% at 1, 12, and 18 months follow-up, respectively. The score of CIVIQ one week preoperation was 69.14 ± 11.44 while that of CIVIQ one month postoperation was 85.32 ± 4.89. The life quality has significantly improved after the operation of EVLA (t = 12.71, P < 0.05). The VAS one month after treatment was lower than 1 week before therapy (t = 8.048, P < 0.05). Major complications such as deep vein thrombosis and skin burns were not found. Most of the complications were minor and improved quickly.

CONCLUSIONS:

This refinement type of EVLA procedure is a safe and effective treatment with a high satisfaction rate; it displayed noteworthy features including shortening hospitalization, early ambulant activity, and preferable occlusion rates.

PMID:
23422100
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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