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Behav Res Ther. 2013 May;51(4-5):197-206. doi: 10.1016/j.brat.2013.01.004. Epub 2013 Jan 18.

Effectiveness of peer-led dissonance-based eating disorder prevention groups: results from two randomized pilot trials.

Author information

1
Oregon Research Institute, USA. stice@psy.utexas.edu

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

The present preliminary trials tested whether undergraduate peer leaders can effectively deliver a dissonance-based eating disorder prevention program, which could facilitate broad dissemination of this efficacious intervention.

METHOD:

In Study 1, female undergraduates (N=171) were randomized to peer-led groups, clinician-led groups, or an educational brochure control condition. In Study 2, which improved a design limitation of Study 1 by using completely parallel outcome measures across conditions, female undergraduates (N=148) were randomized to either immediate peer-led groups or a waitlist control condition.

RESULTS:

In Study 1, participants in peer- and clinician-led groups showed significantly greater pre-post reductions in risk factors and eating disorder symptoms than controls (M d=.64 and .98 respectively), though clinician- versus peer-led groups had higher attendance and competence ratings, and produced stronger effects at posttest (M d=.32) and at 1-year follow-up (M d=.26). In Study 2, participants in peer-led groups showed greater pre-post reductions in all outcomes than waitlist controls (M d=.75).

CONCLUSIONS:

Results provide novel evidence that dissonance-based eating disorder prevention groups led by undergraduate peers are feasible and produce greater reductions in eating disorder risk factors and symptoms than minimal-intervention control conditions, but indicate that effects are smaller for peer- versus clinician-led groups.

PMID:
23419888
PMCID:
PMC3917500
DOI:
10.1016/j.brat.2013.01.004
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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