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PLoS One. 2013;8(2):e56459. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0056459. Epub 2013 Feb 13.

Gender differences in 1-year clinical characteristics and outcomes after stroke: results from the China National Stroke Registry.

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1
Department of Neurology, Beijing Tiantan Hospital, Capital Medical University, Beijing, China.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Previous reports have shown inconsistent results on clinical outcomes between women and men after stroke, and little is known about gender differences on outcomes in Chinese post-stroke patients. The aim of this study was to explore whether there were gender differences on clinical characteristics and outcomes in Chinese patients after ischemic stroke by using the data from the China National Stroke Registry (CNSR).

METHODS AND FINDINGS:

Out of 12,415 consecutively recruited patients with acute ischemic stroke in the CNSR from 2007 to 2008, 11,560 (93.1%) patients were followed up for 12 months. Their clinical characteristics and outcomes on death, recurrence, and dependency were recorded. The multivariate logistic regression was performed to determine whether there were gender differences in these outcomes. Women were older than men at baseline (67.9 vs. 64.0 years, P<0.001). Women had a higher mortality, recurrence rate, and dependency rate at 3, 6, and 12 months than men, but after adjusting for age, history of diabetes, pre-stroke dependency, stroke severity, in-hospital complications, and other confounders, there were no statistically significant differences in gender on mortality and recurrence rate at 3, 6, and 12 months; and dependency rate at 3, and 6 months. However, the dependency rate at 12 months remained significantly higher in women (odds ratio, 1.24; 95% confidence interval, 1.06 to 1.45).

CONCLUSIONS:

There are many differences in clinical characteristics between women and men after ischemic stroke in China. Compared with men, women are more dependent at 12 months after stroke. This difference still exists after controlling the potential confounders.

PMID:
23418571
PMCID:
PMC3572058
DOI:
10.1371/journal.pone.0056459
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
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