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J Phys Act Health. 2014 Mar;11(3):528-35. doi: 10.1123/jpah.2012-0030. Epub 2013 Feb 8.

The role of symptoms and self-efficacy in predicting physical activity change among older adults with arthritis.

Author information

1
General Internal Medicine, Duke University, Durham, NC.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Physical and psychological symptoms limit physical activity for people with arthritis. This study examined if self-efficacy mediated a relationship between symptom and physical activity (PA) frequency change.

METHODS:

This was a secondary analysis of older adults with arthritis and joint pain in a trial of a lifestyle PA program (n = 339). Measures were depressive symptoms, pain, fatigue, arthritis self-efficacy, PA self-efficacy, and PA frequency. A panel model was used to analyze relationships at baseline and changes at 20 weeks.

RESULTS:

The mean age was 68.8 years. At baseline, depression and fatigue were associated with arthritis self-efficacy (β = -.34 and -.24) and, in turn, PA self-efficacy (β = .63); PA self-efficacy was associated with PA (β = .15). Pain and depression changes were associated with arthritis self-efficacy change (β = -.20 and -.21) and, in turn, PA self-efficacy (β = .32) change; PA self-efficacy change was associated with PA change (β = .36).

CONCLUSION:

Change in symptom severity affected change in PA frequency. These relationships appeared to operate through self-efficacy. Over time, pain appeared to have a stronger relationship than fatigue with self-efficacy and PA. These findings support strategies to help people with arthritis strengthen their confidence for symptom coping and PA participation.

PMID:
23416927
DOI:
10.1123/jpah.2012-0030
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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