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Am J Pathol. 2013 Apr;182(4):1347-56. doi: 10.1016/j.ajpath.2012.12.036. Epub 2013 Feb 15.

Screening for potential targets for therapy in mesenchymal, clear cell, and dedifferentiated chondrosarcoma reveals Bcl-2 family members and TGFβ as potential targets.

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1
Department of Pathology, Leiden University Medical Center, 2333 ZA Leiden, The Netherlands.

Abstract

The mesenchymal, clear cell, and dedifferentiated chondrosarcoma subtypes are extremely rare, together constituting 10% to 15% of all chondrosarcomas. Their poor prognosis and lack of efficacious treatment emphasizes the need to elucidate the pathways playing a pivotal role in these tumors. We constructed tissue microarrays containing 42 dedifferentiated, 23 clear cell, and 23 mesenchymal chondrosarcomas and performed immunohistochemistry to study the expression of growth plate-signaling molecules and molecules shown to be involved in conventional chondrosarcoma. We observed high expression of SOX-9 and FGFR-3, as well as aberrant cellular localization of heparan sulfate proteoglycans, in all subtypes. TGFβ signaling through p-SMAD2 and PAI-1 was highly active in all chondrosarcoma subtypes, which suggests that TGFβ inhibitors as a possible therapeutic strategy in rare chondrosarcoma subtypes. As in conventional chondrosarcoma, antiapoptotic proteins (Bcl-2, and/or Bcl-xl) were highly expressed in all subtypes. Inhibition with the BH-3 mimetic ABT-737 rendered dedifferentiated chondrosarcoma cell lines sensitive to doxorubicin or cisplatin. Our data indicate that antiapoptotic proteins may play an important role in chemoresistance, suggesting a promising role for targeting Bcl-2 family members in chondrosarcoma treatment, irrespective of the subtype.

PMID:
23415961
DOI:
10.1016/j.ajpath.2012.12.036
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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