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Am J Public Health. 2013 Apr;103(4):703-9. doi: 10.2105/AJPH.2012.300939. Epub 2013 Feb 14.

Health cobenefits and transportation-related reductions in greenhouse gas emissions in the San Francisco Bay area.

Author information

1
California Department of Public Health, Richmond, CA 94804, USA. Neil.Maizlish@cdph.ca.gov

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:

We quantified health benefits of transportation strategies to reduce greenhouse gas emissions (GHGE).

METHODS:

Statistics on travel patterns and injuries, physical activity, fine particulate matter, and GHGE in the San Francisco Bay Area, California, were input to a model that calculated the health impacts of walking and bicycling short distances usually traveled by car or driving low-emission automobiles. We measured the change in disease burden in disability-adjusted life years (DALYs) based on dose-response relationships and the distributions of physical activity, particulate matter, and traffic injuries.

RESULTS:

Increasing median daily walking and bicycling from 4 to 22 minutes reduced the burden of cardiovascular disease and diabetes by 14% (32,466 DALYs), increased the traffic injury burden by 39% (5907 DALYS), and decreased GHGE by 14%. Low-carbon driving reduced GHGE by 33.5% and cardiorespiratory disease burden by less than 1%.

CONCLUSIONS:

Increased physical activity associated with active transport could generate a large net improvement in population health. Measures would be needed to minimize pedestrian and bicyclist injuries. Together, active transport and low-carbon driving could achieve GHGE reductions sufficient for California to meet legislative mandates.

PMID:
23409903
PMCID:
PMC3673232
DOI:
10.2105/AJPH.2012.300939
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
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