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Tech Coloproctol. 2014 Jan;18(1):23-8. doi: 10.1007/s10151-013-0981-3. Epub 2013 Feb 14.

Management of colorectal cancer in patients with inflammatory bowel disease.

Author information

1
Center for Colorectal Disease, St. Vincent's University Hospital, Dublin, Ireland, dara_kav@hotmail.com.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

This study evaluated the clinicopathological features and survival rates of patients with inflammatory bowel disease who developed colorectal cancer (CRC).

METHODS:

A retrospective review was performed on a prospectively maintained institutional database (1981-2011) to identify patients with inflammatory bowel disease who developed CRC. Clinicopathological parameters, management and outcomes were analysed.

RESULTS:

A total of 2,843 patients with inflammatory bowel disease were identified. One thousand six hundred and forty-two had ulcerative colitis (UC) and 1,201 had Crohn's disease (CD). Following exclusion criteria, there were 29 patients with biopsy-proven colorectal carcinoma, 22 of whom had UC and 7 had CD. Twenty-six patients had a preoperative diagnosis of malignancy/dysplasia; 16 of these were diagnosed at surveillance endoscopy. Nodal/distant metastasis was identified at presentation in 47 and 71 % of the UC and CD group, respectively. Operative morbidity for UC and CD was 33 and 17 %, respectively. Despite the less favourable operative outcomes following surgery management of UC-related CRC, overall 5-year survival was significantly better in the UC group compared to the CD group (41 vs. 29 %; p = 0.04) reflecting the difference in stage at presentation between the two groups.

CONCLUSIONS:

Patients who undergo surgery for UC-related CRC have less favourable short-term outcomes but present at a less advanced stage and have a more favourable long-term prognosis than similar patients with CRC and CD.

PMID:
23407916
DOI:
10.1007/s10151-013-0981-3
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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