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Prev Med. 2013 May;56(5):326-8. doi: 10.1016/j.ypmed.2013.01.012. Epub 2013 Feb 8.

Do physician beliefs about causes of obesity translate into actionable issues on which physicians counsel their patients?

Author information

1
Department of Health Policy and Management, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, MD 21205, USA. sbleich@jhsph.edu

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To describe the relationship between primary care physicians' (PCPs') beliefs about the causes of obesity with the frequency of nutritional counseling.

METHODS:

We analyzed a national cross-sectional internet-based survey of 500 US PCPs collected between February and March 2011.

RESULTS:

PCPs that identified overconsumption of food as a very important cause of obesity had significantly greater odds of counseling patients to reduce portion sizes (OR 3.40; 95%CI: 1.73-6.68) and to avoid high calorie ingredients when cooking (OR 2.16; 95%CI: 1.07-4.33). Physicians who believed that restaurant/fast food eating was a very important cause of obesity had significantly greater odds of counseling patients to avoid high calorie menu items outside the home (OR 1.93; 95%CI: 1.20-3.11). Physicians who reported that sugar-sweetened beverages were a very important cause of obesity had significantly greater odds of counseling their obese patients to reduce consumption (OR 5.99; 95%CI: 3.53-10.17).

CONCLUSIONS:

PCP beliefs about the diet-related causes of obesity may translate into actionable nutritional counseling topics for physicians to use with their patients.

PMID:
23399006
PMCID:
PMC3745015
DOI:
10.1016/j.ypmed.2013.01.012
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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