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J Plast Reconstr Aesthet Surg. 2013 May;66(5):608-16. doi: 10.1016/j.bjps.2013.01.001. Epub 2013 Feb 5.

Analysis of immediate vascular reconstruction for lower-limb salvage in patients with lower-limb bone and soft-tissue sarcoma.

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1
Department of Plastic, Reconstructive and Aesthetic Surgery, Nippon Medical School Hospital, Tokyo, Japan. s8013@nms.ac.jp

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Limb amputation has historically been the first choice of treatment for patients with bone or soft-tissue sarcomas involving major blood vessels. However, recent advances in surgical technique have allowed limb-salvage surgery. We reviewed our experiences with limb-salvage surgery and immediate vascular reconstruction following en bloc resection of bone or soft-tissue sarcomas of the lower extremity.

MATERIALS AND METHOD:

We reviewed 23 patients (15 male and eight female; mean age, 43.6 years) who underwent limb-salvage surgery and immediate vascular reconstruction. Details of surgical factors and postoperative complications were evaluated.

RESULTS:

Reconstructed vessels remained patent in 21 cases. The rate of limb oedema was higher in patients who underwent only arterial reconstruction after arteriovenous resection. Twenty patients could walk well without crutches a few months after reconstructive surgery. All patients avoided amputation. Two patients died of disseminated disease within 3 years after surgery.

CONCLUSION:

The high rate of limb oedema suggests that venous reconstruction is necessary after arteriovenous resection. Vascular reconstruction and musculocutaneous flap techniques are useful in limb-salvage surgery and are indicated for patients who have achieved good disease control. Evidence Rating Scale for Therapeutic Studies: Level III.

PMID:
23391538
DOI:
10.1016/j.bjps.2013.01.001
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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