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Psychol Health. 2013;28(8):874-94. doi: 10.1080/08870446.2012.762979. Epub 2013 Feb 7.

Emotional approach coping: gender differences on psychological adjustment in young to middle-aged cancer survivors.

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1
Department of Psychology, University of Connecticut, Storrs, CT, USA. dalnim.cho@uconn.edu

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

The effect of emotional approach coping (EAC) varies by gender. However, this gender difference has not yet been investigated in cancer survivors. We investigated whether the effects of two kinds of EAC--emotional processing (EP) and emotional expression (EE)--vary by gender and whether EAC has effects above and beyond the effect of other coping strategies.

DESIGN:

EAC and other coping strategies were assessed at baseline in a sample of 248 young to middle-aged adult (between the age of 22 and 55) cancer survivors. One hundred and sixty-six survivors responded to psychological adjustment one year later.

RESULTS:

EAC had different relationships with Time 2 adjustment in men and women. Hierarchical regression analyses showed that for men, EE predicted lower intrusive thoughts and, for women, EP was associated with higher positive affect when other coping strategies and EE were controlled.

CONCLUSION:

Gender differences held true in cancer survivors, and EAC was effective when other coping strategies were controlled. Further, EE was effective in reducing negative adjustment in men while EP was helpful in promoting positive adjustment in women.

PMID:
23391312
DOI:
10.1080/08870446.2012.762979
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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