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Cell Cycle. 2013 Mar 1;12(5):818-25. doi: 10.4161/cc.23722. Epub 2013 Feb 6.

Cigarette smoke metabolically promotes cancer, via autophagy and premature aging in the host stromal microenvironment.

Author information

1
Kimmel Cancer Center, Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, PA, USA. salem_ahmed82@yahoo.com

Abstract

Cigarette smoke has been directly implicated in the disease pathogenesis of a plethora of different human cancer subtypes, including breast cancers. The prevailing view is that cigarette smoke acts as a mutagen and DNA damaging agent in normal epithelial cells, driving tumor initiation. However, its potential negative metabolic effects on the normal stromal microenvironment have been largely ignored. Here, we propose a new mechanism by which carcinogen-rich cigarette smoke may promote cancer growth, by metabolically "fertilizing" the host microenvironment. More specifically, we show that cigarette smoke exposure is indeed sufficient to drive the onset of the cancer-associated fibroblast phenotype via the induction of DNA damage, autophagy and mitophagy in the tumor stroma. In turn, cigarette smoke exposure induces premature aging and mitochondrial dysfunction in stromal fibroblasts, leading to the secretion of high-energy mitochondrial fuels, such as L-lactate and ketone bodies. Hence, cigarette smoke induces catabolism in the local microenvironment, directly fueling oxidative mitochondrial metabolism (OXPHOS) in neighboring epithelial cancer cells, actively promoting anabolic tumor growth. Remarkably, these autophagic-senescent fibroblasts increased breast cancer tumor growth in vivo by up to 4-fold. Importantly, we show that cigarette smoke-induced metabolic reprogramming of the fibroblastic stroma occurs independently of tumor neo-angiogenesis. We discuss the possible implications of our current findings for the prevention of aging-associated human diseases and, especially, common epithelial cancers, as we show that cigarette smoke can systemically accelerate aging in the host microenvironment. Finally, our current findings are consistent with the idea that cigarette smoke induces the "reverse Warburg effect," thereby fueling "two-compartment tumor metabolism" and oxidative mitochondrial metabolism in epithelial cancer cells.

KEYWORDS:

autophagy; breast cancer; cancer prevention; carcinogens; cigarette smoke; ketone bodies; lactate; microenvironment; mitochondrial dysfunction; premature aging; senescence; tumor growth

PMID:
23388463
PMCID:
PMC3610729
DOI:
10.4161/cc.23722
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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