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Pediatr Res. 2013 May;73(5):647-54. doi: 10.1038/pr.2013.23. Epub 2013 Feb 5.

Esophageal human β-defensin expression in eosinophilic esophagitis.

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1
Department of Pediatrics, Gastrointestinal Eosinophilic Diseases Program, University of Colorado School of Medicine, Aurora, Colorado, USA.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Defensins are antimicrobial peptides expressed on mucosal surfaces that contribute to maintaining intestinal homeostasis by providing innate defense mechanisms for the epithelia. Defensin expression is altered in a number of diseases that affect mucosal surfaces, such as atopic dermatitis, allergic rhinitis, and inflammatory bowel disease. Similar to atopic dermatitis, eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE) is a chronic disease in which the squamous epithelial surface is affected by a similar TH2 microenvironment and eosinophil-predominant inflammation. Therefore, we hypothesized that defensin expression would be decreased in EoE.

METHODS:

To address this, we measured defensin expression in vitro in cell lines derived from patients with EoE (EoE1-T) or gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) (NES-G4T cells) and ex vivo in esophageal mucosal biopsy samples from children with EoE or GERD and control children without esophageal disease.

RESULTS:

Interleukin-5 induced a decrease in human β-defensin (hBD) -1 and hBD3 expression in EoE1-T but not in NES-G4T cells. Compared with esophageal biopsy specimens from GERD and control children, specimens from EoE pediatric patients revealed a significant decrease in mRNA and protein expression for hBD1 and hBD3.

CONCLUSION:

Diminished expression of hBD1 and hBD3 may make the esophageal epithelium more susceptible to the development and/or perpetuation of EoE.

PMID:
23385963
PMCID:
PMC3844519
DOI:
10.1038/pr.2013.23
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
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