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Gynecol Oncol. 2013 May;129(2):372-6. doi: 10.1016/j.ygyno.2013.01.027. Epub 2013 Feb 4.

In vitro fertilization is associated with an increased risk of borderline ovarian tumours.

Author information

1
School of Population Health, Faculty of Medicine, Dentistry and Health Sciences, The University of Western Australia, M431, 35 Stirling Highway, Crawley, WA 6009, Australia. louise.stewart@uwa.edu.au

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:

To compare the risk of borderline ovarian tumours in women having in vitro fertilization (IVF) with women diagnosed with infertility but not having IVF.

METHODS:

This was a whole-population cohort study of women aged 20-44 years seeking hospital infertility treatment or investigation in Western Australia in 1982-2002. Using Cox regression, we examined the effects of IVF treatment and potential confounders on the rate of borderline ovarian tumours. Potential confounders included parity, age, calendar year, socio-economic status, infertility diagnoses including pelvic inflammatory disorders and endometriosis and surgical procedures including hysterectomy and tubal ligation.

RESULTS:

Women undergoing IVF had an increased rate of borderline ovarian tumours with a hazard ratio (HR) of 2.46 (95% confidence interval [CI] 1.20-5.04). Unlike invasive epithelial ovarian cancer, neither birth (HR 0.89; 95% CI 0.43-1.88) nor hysterectomy (1.02; 0.24-4.37) nor sterilization (1.48; 0.63-3.48) appeared protective and the rate was not increased in women with a diagnosis of endometriosis (HR 0.31; 95% CI 0.04-2.29).

CONCLUSIONS:

Women undergoing IVF treatment are at increased risk of being diagnosed with borderline ovarian tumours. Risk factors for borderline ovarian tumours appear different from those for invasive ovarian cancer.

PMID:
23385152
DOI:
10.1016/j.ygyno.2013.01.027
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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