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J Cosmet Laser Ther. 2013 Apr;15(2):107-13. doi: 10.3109/14764172.2012.758380. Epub 2013 Feb 5.

Skin and antioxidants.

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1
University of Ljubljana, Faculty of Health Studies, Zdravstvena pot 5, 1000 Ljubljana, Slovenia.

Abstract

It is estimated that total sun exposure occurs non-intentionally in three quarters of our lifetimes. Our skin is exposed to majority of UV radiation during outdoor activities, e.g. walking, practicing sports, running, hiking, etc. and not when we are intentionally exposed to the sun on the beach. We rarely use sunscreens during those activities, or at least not as much and as regular as we should and are commonly prone to acute and chronic sun damage of the skin. The only protection of our skin is endogenous (synthesis of melanin and enzymatic antioxidants) and exogenous (antioxidants, which we consume from the food, like vitamins A, C, E, etc.). UV-induced photoaging of the skin becomes clinically evident with age, when endogenous antioxidative mechanisms and repair processes are not effective any more and actinic damage to the skin prevails. At this point it would be reasonable to ingest additional antioxidants and/or to apply them on the skin in topical preparations. We review endogenous and exogenous skin protection with antioxidants.

PMID:
23384037
DOI:
10.3109/14764172.2012.758380
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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