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Arch Argent Pediatr. 2013 Jan-Feb;111(1):22-8. doi: 10.5546/aap.2013.22.

Sedation and analgesia in children undergoing invasive procedures.

[Article in English, Spanish]

Author information

1
Department of Pediatrics, Hospital Clínico, Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile.

Abstract

INTRODUCTION:

As a result of the increased number of both diagnostic and therapeutic procedures in pediatric outpatients, sedation and analgesia have gained relevance in this context.

OBJECTIVE:

To characterize the type of sedation and analgesia used by pediatric sedation teams in procedures done outside the operating room, as well as its safety and outcome.

POPULATION AND METHODS:

All procedures performed in 1 month to 5 year old patients under intravenous sedation with midazolam, ketamine, propofol or lidocaine were analyzed over a 14-month period. The Ramsay sedation scale and the CHEOPS pain scale were used to determine the response to the sedation and analgesia administered.

RESULTS:

A total of 186 procedures were analyzed. The results of the evaluation of response to sedation and analgesia indicated that an adequate deep sedation was obtained in 98% of cases, and that an adequate analgesia was achieved in 92% of patients. Around 12% of the procedures were associated with adverse events, all related to the airways, and none was serious. The only statistically significant endpoint associated with adverse events were procedures which involved airway interventions, i.e., fibrobronchoscopy, upper gastrointestinal endoscopy or transesophageal echocardiogram, with an OR of 6.27 (95% CI: 1.28-30.63; p = 0.023).

CONCLUSIONS:

In this group of patients, intravenous outpatient sedation and analgesia administered by a specialized team were safe and effective.

PMID:
23381701
DOI:
10.5546/aap.2013.22
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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