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Appetite. 2013 Jun;65:1-7. doi: 10.1016/j.appet.2013.01.009. Epub 2013 Jan 30.

Oral administration of omega-7 palmitoleic acid induces satiety and the release of appetite-related hormones in male rats.

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1
Central Research Laboratory, Nippon Suisan Kaisha, Ltd., 32-3 Nanakuni 1 Chome Hachioji, Tokyo 192-0991, Japan. yangzh@nissui.co.jp

Abstract

We have analyzed the effect of palmitoleic acid on short-term food intake in male rats. Administration of omega-7 palmitoleic acid by oral gavage significantly decreased food intake compared to palmitic acid, omega-9 oleic acid, or a vehicle control. Palmitoleic acid exhibited a dose-dependent effect in this context and did not cause general malaise. A triglyceride form of palmitoleate also decreased food intake, whereas olive oil, which is rich in oleic acid, did not. Palmitoleic acid accumulated within the small intestine in a dose-dependent fashion and elevated levels of the satiety hormone cholecystokinin (CCK). Both protein and mRNA levels of CCK were affected in this context. The suppression of food intake by palmitoleic acid was attenuated by intravenous injection of devazepide, a selective peripheral CCK receptor antagonist. Palmitoleic acid did not alter the expression of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha (PPARα) target genes, and a PPARα antagonist did not affect palmitoleic acid-induced satiety. This suggests that the PPARα pathway might not be involved in suppressing food intake in response to palmitoleic acid. We have shown that orally administered palmitoleic acid induced satiety, enhanced the release of satiety hormones in rats.

PMID:
23376733
DOI:
10.1016/j.appet.2013.01.009
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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