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Urology. 2013 Feb;81(2):465.e15-22. doi: 10.1016/j.urology.2012.10.030.

Differentiation of human adipose-derived stem cells co-cultured with urothelium cell line toward a urothelium-like phenotype in a nude murine model.

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1
Department of Urology, Ninth People's Hospital, Shanghai Jiao Tong University School of Medicine, Shanghai, China.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To investigated the urothelium differentiation potential of adipose-derived stem cells (ASCs) that were coimplanted with the immortalized human bladder urothelium cell line (SV-HUC-1) into the subcutaneous tissue of athymic mice.

MATERIALS AND METHODS:

The ASCs were isolated from the human adipose tissue of patients undergoing liposuction procedures and were expanded in vitro. After labeling with CM-DiI, the ASCs were mixed with SV-HUC-1 and implanted into the subcutaneous tissue of athymic mice for 2 and 4 weeks. The urothelium-specific markers uroplakin-Ia and uroplakin-II were detected by immunofluorescence. The transformation rate of ASCs into the urothelium phenotype was evaluated at each measurement point.

RESULTS:

We found that 25.87% ± 1.38% of ASCs expressed the urothelium-specific marker uroplakin-Ia and 23.60% ± 2.57% of ASCs expressed uroplakin-II 2 weeks after coimplantation with SV-HUC-1 in vivo. After 4 weeks, 70.07% ± 3.84% of ASCs expressed uroplakin-Ia and 65.56% ± 2.94% expressed uroplakin-II. However, no obvious organizational multilayered urothelium structure, such as that of the native bladder mucosa, was found in the subcutaneous tissues of the athymic mice.

CONCLUSION:

The results of our study have demonstrated that ASCs could be differentiated toward the urothelium-like phenotype when they were coimplanted in direct contact with cells of a mature urothelium cell line, and the proportion of differentiated cells increased from 2 to 4 weeks. The differentiation potential of ASCs toward the urothelial cell type suggests that ASCs might have potential to be used in urinary tract repair with a tissue engineering approach in the future.

PMID:
23374843
DOI:
10.1016/j.urology.2012.10.030
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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