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Obes Surg. 2013 May;23(5):650-6. doi: 10.1007/s11695-012-0847-1.

Overweight patients achieve ideal body weight following curative gastrectomy resulting in better long-term prognosis.

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  • 1Department of Biotherapy, Tianjin Medical University Cancer Institute and Hospital, Huanhuxi Road, Hexi District, Tianjin, China.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

The relationship between body mass index (BMI) and long-term outcome in gastric cancer patients following radical gastrectomy continues to be debated. We investigated the association between BMI, clinicopathological features, and prognosis in Chinese gastric carcinoma patients.

METHODS:

A retrospective consecutive cohort study was performed on 1,296 patients who underwent gastrectomy with curative intent at the Tianjin Cancer Institute Hospital between 1999 and 2004. The clinicopathological characteristics, overall 5-year survival rate (OS), and preoperative and six-month postoperative BMIs of both overweight (BMI ≥ 25 kg/m(2); H-BMI; n = 364) and non-overweight (BMI <25 kg/m(2); N-BMI; n = 932) patients were compared.

RESULTS:

Among these patients, 364 (28.1 %) were overweight. The OS was significantly higher in the H-BMI than N-BMI group (33.2 vs. 24.1 %, respectively; p < 0.001). Preoperative and six-month postoperative BMIs were 27.1 ± 2.0 and 24.8 ± 2.0 kg/m(2), respectively, in the H-BMI group (p < 0.001), whereas they were 21.7 ± 2.2 and 20.7 ± 2.2 kg/m(2), respectively, in the N-BMI group (p = 0.007). There was significantly better differentiation (p = 0.034), less distant metastases (p = 0.006), and a lower metastatic lymph node ratio (p = 0.014) observed in the H-BMI groups. Multivariate analyses indicated age, BMI, pathological tumor depth, distant metastases, metastatic lymph node ratio, and tumor size as independent prognostic factors.

CONCLUSIONS:

Our findings suggest that overweight patients were less likely to have tumors with aggressive features and can achieve ideal body weight following curative gastrectomy, possibly resulting in better long-term prognosis.

PMID:
23371777
DOI:
10.1007/s11695-012-0847-1
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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