Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Psychopharmacology (Berl). 2013 Jun;227(4):661-72. doi: 10.1007/s00213-013-2992-1. Epub 2013 Feb 1.

The role of cortisol and psychopathy in the cycle of violence.

Author information

1
Program in Neuroscience, Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, University of Texas Health Science Center, Houston, TX, USA. jgowin@ucsd.edu

Abstract

RATIONALE:

Child abuse and neglect are universal risk factors for delinquency, violence, and aggression; this phenomenon is known as the cycle of violence. Additional factors-psychopathy, impulsiveness, and disruptions in the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis-play a role in aggressive behavior but have rarely been examined in the same conceptual and experimental framework.

OBJECTIVES:

We sought to examine the above-mentioned risk factors for aggression in a prospective study employing psychopharmacologic and psychometric techniques.

METHODS:

Sixty-seven adult participants were given an acute dose of 20 mg cortisol in a placebo-controlled, within-subject, counter-balanced dosing design. Salivary cortisol was measured at baseline and at regular intervals across a 5 h testing period. Following dosing, state-aggressive behavior was measured by a laboratory task, the Point-Subtraction Aggression Paradigm. History of child abuse/neglect, psychopathy, impulsivity, and a trait measure of aggression were assessed through self-report questionnaires.

RESULTS:

Using multiple regression, a model including abuse/neglect, psychopathy, impulsivity, and baseline cortisol explained 58 % of the variance in trait aggression and 26 % of the variance in state aggression. Abuse/neglect predicted diminished HPA-axis reactivity and HPA-axis reactivity showed a trend toward predicting state and trait aggression, although it was not a significant mediating variable between abuse/neglect and aggression.

CONCLUSIONS:

The results indicate that child maltreatment, psychopathy and HPA-axis reactivity interact to provide a confluence over aggressive behavior, and intervention efforts need to consider all these factors.

PMID:
23371492
PMCID:
PMC5481784
DOI:
10.1007/s00213-013-2992-1
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Springer Icon for PubMed Central
Loading ...
Support Center