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Transplant Res. 2012 Aug 31;1(1):9. doi: 10.1186/2047-1440-1-9.

Urinary proteomic shotgun approach for identification of potential acute rejection biomarkers in renal transplant recipients.

Author information

  • 1Department of Pharmaceutical Biosciences, School of Pharmacy, University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway. anders.asberg@farmasi.uio.no.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Acute rejection (AR) episodes in renal transplant recipients are suspected when plasma creatinine is elevated and other potential causes out ruled. Graft biopsies are however needed for definite diagnosis. Non-invasive AR-biomarkers is an unmet clinical need. The urinary proteome is an interesting source in the search for such a biomarker in this population.

METHODS:

In this proof of principle study, serial urine samples in the early post transplant phase from 6 patients with biopsy verified acute rejections and 6 age-matched controls without clinical signs of rejection were analyzed by shotgun proteomics.

RESULTS:

Eleven proteins fulfilled predefined criteria for regulation in association with AR. They presented detectable regulation already several days before clinical suspicion of AR (increased plasma creatinine). The regulated proteins could be grouped by their biological function; proteins related to growth and proteins related to immune response. Growth-related proteins (IGFBP7, Vasorin, EGF and Galectin-3-binding protein) were significantly up-regulated in association with AR (P = 0.03) while proteins related to immune response (MASP2, C3, CD59, Ceruloplasmin, PiGR and CD74) tended to be up-regulated ( P = 0.13).

CONCLUSION:

The use of shotgun proteomics provides a robust and sensitive method for identification of potentially predictive urinary biomarkers of AR. Further validation of the current findings is needed to establish their potential clinical role with regards to clinical AR diagnosis.

TRIAL REGISTRATION:

ClinicalTrials.gov number NCT00139009.

PMID:
23369437
PMCID:
PMC3561036
DOI:
10.1186/2047-1440-1-9
[PubMed]
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