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Aging Cell. 2013 Apr;12(2):257-68. doi: 10.1111/acel.12049. Epub 2013 Mar 11.

Protein restriction cycles reduce IGF-1 and phosphorylated Tau, and improve behavioral performance in an Alzheimer's disease mouse model.

Author information

1
Longevity Institute, Davis School of Gerontology, and Department of Biological Sciences, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA 90089-0191, USA.

Abstract

In laboratory animals, calorie restriction (CR) protects against aging, oxidative stress, and neurodegenerative pathologies. Reduced levels of growth hormone and IGF-1, which mediate some of the protective effects of CR, can also extend longevity and/or protect against age-related diseases in rodents and humans. However, severely restricted diets are difficult to maintain and are associated with chronically low weight and other major side effects. Here we show that 4 months of periodic protein restriction cycles (PRCs) with supplementation of nonessential amino acids in mice already displaying significant cognitive impairment and Alzheimer's disease (AD)-like pathology reduced circulating IGF-1 levels by 30-70% and caused an 8-fold increase in IGFBP-1. Whereas PRCs did not affect the levels of β amyloid (Aβ), they decreased tau phosphorylation in the hippocampus and alleviated the age-dependent impairment in cognitive performance. These results indicate that periodic protein restriction cycles without CR can promote changes in circulating growth factors and tau phosphorylation associated with protection against age-related neuropathologies.

PMID:
23362919
PMCID:
PMC3982836
DOI:
10.1111/acel.12049
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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