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Surg Innov. 2014 Apr;21(2):155-65. doi: 10.1177/1553350612474496. Epub 2013 Jan 28.

Laparoscopy decreases the laparotomy rate in hemodynamically stable patients with blunt abdominal trauma.

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1
1Department of Trauma, National Taiwan University Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

This study evaluated the use of laparoscopy in hemodynamically stable patients with blunt abdominal trauma.

METHODS:

We retrospectively reviewed the medical records of hemodynamically stable blunt abdominal trauma patients. Patients admitted from July 1, 2003, to June 30, 2006 (prior to the adoption of laparoscopy for patients with blunt abdominal trauma) were categorized as group A. Patients admitted from July 1, 2007, to June 30, 2010, when laparoscopy was included in the algorithm for the management of blunt abdominal trauma, were categorized as group B.

RESULTS:

There were 47 patients in group A and 57 patients in group B. There were no significant differences in demographic characteristics, injury severity score, and injuries requiring surgical intervention between the groups (all, P > .05). Patients in group B had a shorter hospital stay (11 days vs 21 days, P < .001) and shorter ICU stay (0 [0, 1] days vs. 0 [0, 9] days, P = .029). In group A, 6 of 47 patients (12.8%) underwent a nontherapeutic laparotomy. In contrast, 9 of 57 patients (15.8%) in group B avoided a nontherapeutic laparotomy because no significant intra-abdominal findings warranting an intervention were disclosed by laparoscopy. The incidence of laparotomy for patients with significant injuries in group B was lower than in group A (4.2% vs. 100.0%; P < .001). There was no difference in the complication rate between the groups.

CONCLUSIONS:

Laparoscopy is feasible and safe for the diagnosis and treatment of hemodynamically stable patients with blunt abdominal trauma and can reduce the laparotomy rate.

KEYWORDS:

blunt abdominal trauma; diagnostic laparoscopy; laparoscopy; therapeutic laparoscopy

PMID:
23361491
DOI:
10.1177/1553350612474496
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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