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World J Urol. 2013 Jun;31(3):471-80. doi: 10.1007/s00345-012-1018-7. Epub 2013 Jan 26.

Functional outcomes following robotic prostatectomy using athermal, traction free risk-stratified grades of nerve sparing.

Author information

1
LeFrak Institute of Robotic Surgery, Centre for Prostate Cancer Research and Clinical Care, Department of Urology, Weill Cornell Medical College, New York Presbyterian Hospital, New York, NY 10065, USA. AshTewariMD@Gmail.com

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To report our unique approach for individualizing robotic prostate cancer surgery by risk stratification and sub classification of the periprostatic space into 4 distinct compartments, and thus performing 4 precise different grades of nerve sparing based on neurosurgical principles and to present updated potency and continence outcomes data of patients undergoing robotic-assisted laparoscopic prostatectomy (RALP) using our risk-stratified approach based on layers of periprostatic fascial dissection.

PATIENTS AND METHODS:

(1) Between January 2005 and December 2010, 2,536 men underwent RALP by a single surgeon at our institution. (2) Included patients were those with ≥ 1-year follow-up and were preoperatively continent and potent, defined as having a SHIM questionnaire score of >21; thus, the final number of patient in the study cohort was 1,335. (3) Postoperative potency was defined as the ability to have successful intercourse (score of ≥ 4 on question 2 of the SHIM); continence was defined as the use of no pads per 24 h.

RESULTS:

(1) The potency and continence for NS grades 1, 2, 3, and 4 were found to be 90.6, 76.2, 60.5, and 57.1 % (P < 0.001) and 98, 93.2, 90.1, and 88.9 % (P < 0.001), respectively. (2) The overall PSM rates for patients with NS grades 1, 2, 3, and 4 were 10.5, 7, 5.8, and 4.8 %, respectively (P = 0.064).

CONCLUSIONS:

The study found a correlation between risk-stratified grades of NS technique and continence and potency. Patients with lesser grades of NS had higher rates of potency and continence.

PMID:
23354288
DOI:
10.1007/s00345-012-1018-7
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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