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Can Assoc Radiol J. 2013 Feb;64(1):10-4. doi: 10.1016/j.carj.2012.12.001.

A literature review of findings in physical elder abuse.

Author information

1
Joint Department of Medical Imaging, University Health Network, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. Kieran.murphy@uhn.ca

Abstract

PURPOSE:

To review the medical literature for reports on the types of physical injuries in elder abuse with the aim of eliciting patterns that will aid its detection.

MATERIALS AND METHODS:

The databases of PubMed, CINAHL, EMBASE, and TRIP were searched from 1975 to March 2012 for articles that contained the following phrases: "physical elder abuse," "older adult abuse," "elder mistreatment," "geriatric abuse," "geriatric trauma," and "nonaccidental geriatric injury." Distribution and description of injuries in physical elder abuse from case-control studies, cross-sectional studies, case series, and case reports as seen at autopsy, in hospital emergency departments, or in medicolegal reports were tabulated and summarized.

RESULTS:

A review of 9 articles from a total of 574 articles screened yielded 839 injuries. The anatomic distribution in these was as follows: upper extremity, 43.98%; maxillofacial, dental, and neck, 22.88%; skull and brain, 12.28%; lower extremity, 10.61%; and torso, 10.25%.

CONCLUSION:

Two-thirds of injuries that occur in elder abuse are to the upper extremity and maxillofacial region. The social context in which the injuries takes place remains crucial to accurate identification of abuse. This includes a culture of violence in the family; a demented, debilitated, or depressed and socially isolated victim; and a perpetrator profile of mental illness, alcohol or drug abuse, or emotional and/or financial dependence on the victim.

PMID:
23351969
DOI:
10.1016/j.carj.2012.12.001
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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