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Emerg Infect Dis. 2013 Feb;19(2):223-9. doi: 10.3201/eid1902.120940.

Severe lower respiratory tract infection in early infancy and pneumonia hospitalizations among children, Kenya.

Author information

1
KEMRI-Wellcome Trust Research Programme Centre for Geographic Medicine Research–Coast, Kilifi, Kenya. pmunywoki@kilifi.kemri-wellcome.org

Abstract

Severe lower respiratory tract infection (LRTI) in infants caused by respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) has been associated with later pneumonia hospitalization among children. To determine risk for pneumonia after RSV hospitalization in infancy, we conducted a retrospective cohort analysis of 2,813 infants admitted to a hospital in Kenya and identified readmissions for pneumonia among this group during early childhood (<60 months of age). Incidence of readmission for pneumonia was higher for children whose first admission as infants was for LRTI and who were <3 months of age than for children who were first admitted as infants for non-LRTI, irrespective of RSV status. Incidence of readmission for pneumonia with wheeze was higher for children whose first admission involved RSV compared with those who had non-RSV LRTI. Excess pneumonia risk persisted for 2 years after the initial hospitalization. Close postdischarge follow-up of infants with LRTI, with or without RSV, could help prevent severe pneumonia later in childhood.

PMID:
23347702
PMCID:
PMC3559052
DOI:
10.3201/eid1902.120940
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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