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J Korean Med Sci. 2013 Jan;28(1):120-7. doi: 10.3346/jkms.2013.28.1.120. Epub 2013 Jan 8.

Risk factors for neurologic complications of hand, foot and mouth disease in the Republic of Korea, 2009.

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1
Department of Pediatrics, College of Medicine, The Catholic University of Korea, Seoul, Korea.

Abstract

In 2009, the first outbreak of hand, foot and mouth disease (HFMD) or herpangina (HP) caused by enterovirus 71 occurred in the Republic of Korea. This study inquired into risk factors associated with complications of HFMD or HP. A retrospective medical records review was conducted on HFMD or HP patients for whom etiologic viruses had been verified in 2009. One hundred sixty-eight patients were examined for this investigation. Eighty patients were without complications while 88 were accompanied by complications, and 2 had expired. Enterovirus 71 subgenotype C4a was the most prevalent in number with 67 cases (54.9%). In the univariate analysis, the disease patterns of HFMD rather than HP, fever longer than 4 days, peak body temperature over 39℃, vomiting, headache, neurologic signs, serum glucose over 100 mg/dL, and having an enterovirus 71 as a causative virus were significant risk factors of the complications. After multiple logistic analysis, headache (Odds ratio [OR], 10.75; P < 0.001) and neurologic signs (OR, 42.76; P < 0.001) were found to be the most significant factors. Early detection and proper management of patients with aforementioned risk factors would be necessary in order to attain a better clinical outcome.

KEYWORDS:

Coxsackievirus; Enterovirus A, Human; Hand, Foot and Mouth Disease; Herpangina; Risk Factors

PMID:
23341722
PMCID:
PMC3546090
DOI:
10.3346/jkms.2013.28.1.120
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
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