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Gerontologist. 2013 Dec;53(6):985-97. doi: 10.1093/geront/gns193. Epub 2013 Jan 20.

Effects of the NYU caregiver intervention-adult child on residential care placement.

Author information

1
*Address correspondence to Joseph E. Gaugler, School of Nursing & Center on Aging, University of Minnesota, 6-153 Weaver-Densford Hall, 1331, 308 Harvard Street S.E., Minneapolis, MN 55455. E-mail: gaug0015@umn.edu.

Abstract

PURPOSE:

This study determined whether the NYU Caregiver Intervention, adapted in Minnesota for adult child caregivers (NYUCI-AC), prevented or delayed residential care placement for persons with dementia.

DESIGN AND METHODS:

A single-blinded randomized controlled trial design was used. One hundred and seven adult child caregivers of persons with dementia were randomly assigned to the NYUCI-AC treatment group who received individual and family counseling, support group referral, and ad hoc consultation or a contact control group. Participants were asked to complete structured assessments quarterly during Year 1 and every 6 months thereafter for a minimum of 2 years.

RESULTS:

Two thirds (66%) of adult child caregivers in the control condition admitted their parent to a residential care setting compared with 37% in the treatment condition. Logistic regression and Cox proportional hazards models found that NYUCI-AC participants were significantly less likely (p < .05) to admit their parents to a residential care setting and delayed their parents' time to admission significantly longer (228.36 days longer on average) than those in the control group.

IMPLICATIONS:

The multicomponent NYUCI-AC offered adult children the psychosocial support required to continue providing care to cognitively impaired parents at home.

KEYWORDS:

Alzheimer’s disease; Caregiving; Institutionalization; Intervention; Nursing home admission

PMID:
23339050
PMCID:
PMC3826164
DOI:
10.1093/geront/gns193
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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