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Injury. 2013 Mar;44(3):386-90. doi: 10.1016/j.injury.2013.01.009. Epub 2013 Jan 18.

Arthroscopic reconstruction of triangular fibrocartilage complex (TFCC) with tendon graft for chronic DRUJ instability.

Author information

1
Department of Orthopaedics and Traumatology, Prince of Wales Hospital, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong, China. Electronic address: tse@ort.cuhk.edu.hk.
2
Department of Orthopaedics and Traumatology, United Christian's Hospital, Hong Kong, China.
3
Department of Orthopaedics and Traumatology, Prince of Wales Hospital, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong, China.
4
Department of Orthopaedics and Traumatology, Faculty of Medicine, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Prince of Wales Hospital, Hong Kong, China.

Abstract

PURPOSE:

To report the 10-years' experience of a novel arthroscopic assisted anatomical TFCC reconstruction in treatment of chronic DRUJ instability resulting from irreparable TFCC injuries.

MATERIALS AND METHODS:

15 patients (7 males, 8 females) with mean age of 37 (17-49) suffering from irreparable TFCC injuries received arthroscopic assisted reconstruction using palmaris longus graft. Three skin incisions were made with creation of one radial and one ulna tunnel for passage of graft following the path of dorsal and palmar radio-ulnar ligaments under fluoroscopic and arthroscopic guidance. The joint capsule was kept intact. Early mid-range forearm rotation was started since 4th week postoperatively.

RESULTS:

The mean follow-up was 85.53 months (32-138). Mayo wrist score improved from 62.5 to 88 (p<0.05). Comparing contralateral side, total prono-supination range increased from 76.6% to 92.1% and grip strength increased from 56.1% to 76.9%. Twelve patients resumed previous jobs. No evidence of DRUJ arthritis was noticed. Complications included 2 late graft ruptures and one unexplained dystonia.

CONCLUSIONS:

Our arthroscopic assisted approach on TFCC reconstruction is safe, produces comparable results as the standard technique and may achieve better range of motion with less soft tissue dissection and earlier mobilization.

PMID:
23337702
DOI:
10.1016/j.injury.2013.01.009
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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