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Endocr Pract. 2013 Mar-Apr;19(2):219-25. doi: 10.4158/EP12207.OR.

Primary hyperparathyroidism is associated with subclinical peripheral neural alterations.

Author information

1
Divisão de Endocrinologia e Diabetes, Hospital Agamenon Magalhães - SUS, Universidade de Pernambuco, Recife, Brazil. erik_td@hotmail.com

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

Some case reports have suggested primary hyperparathyroidism (PHPT) and peripheral polyneuropathy (PPN) are associated; however, there are no reports of studies examining this possible relationship. The aim of this study was to evaluate peripheral nerve conduction in subjects with PHPT.

METHODS:

The study involved 17 patients with PHPT. Mean patient age was 60.5 ± 12.9 years, serum calcium concentration was 11.5 ± 1.0 mg/dL, and the serum parathyroid hormone (PTH) level was 315 ± 569 pg/dL. The control group comprised 17 individuals without PHPT. The mean age of controls was 60.8 ± 12.5 years and the serum calcium concentration was 9.8 ± 0.3 mg/dL. Motor and sensory nerve conduction was assessed by electroneurography (ENG).

RESULTS:

The following ENG parameters differed significantly between the PHPT and control groups: right (R) sural sensory nerve action potential conduction velocity (52.7 ± 6.3 m/s versus 58.0 ± 8.0 m/s; P = .041); R median compound muscle action potential (CMAP) amplitude (7.4 ± 1.6 mV versus 8.9 ± 1.7 mV; P = .002); R median CMAP latency (4.3 ± 1.2 ms versus 3.6 ± 0.6 ms; P = .032); R tibial CMAP latency (4.2 ± 1.1 ms versus 3.3 ± 0.4 ms; P = .001). The neurological examination was normal in all patients.

CONCLUSION:

Our data demonstrate an association between PHPT and peripheral neurological alterations, consistent with subclinical sensory-motor PPN.

PMID:
23337140
DOI:
10.4158/EP12207.OR
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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