Format

Send to

Choose Destination
ACS Chem Neurosci. 2013 Jan 16;4(1):110-21. doi: 10.1021/cn300072u. Epub 2012 Aug 11.

Synergism between a serotonin 5-HT2A receptor (5-HT2AR) antagonist and 5-HT2CR agonist suggests new pharmacotherapeutics for cocaine addiction.

Author information

1
Center for Addiction Research, Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, University of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston, Texas, United States. kcunning@utmb.edu

Abstract

Relapse to cocaine dependence, even after extended abstinence, involves a number of liability factors including impulsivity (predisposition toward rapid, unplanned reactions to stimuli without regard to negative consequences) and cue reactivity (sensitivity to cues associated with cocaine-taking which can promote cocaine-seeking). These factors have been mechanistically linked to serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine, 5-HT) signaling through the 5-HT(2A) receptor (5-HT(2A)R) and 5-HT(2C)R; either a selective 5-HT(2A)R antagonist or a 5-HT(2C)R agonist suppresses impulsivity and cocaine-seeking in preclinical models. We conducted proof-of-concept analyses to evaluate whether a combination of 5-HT(2A)R antagonist plus 5-HT(2C)R agonist would have synergistic effects over these liability factors for relapse as measured in a 1-choice serial reaction time task and cocaine self-administration/reinstatement assay. Combined administration of a dose of the selective 5-HT(2A)R antagonist M100907 plus the 5-HT(2C)R agonist WAY163909, each ineffective alone, synergistically suppressed cocaine-induced hyperactivity, inherent and cocaine-evoked impulsive action, as well as cue- and cocaine-primed reinstatement of cocaine-seeking behavior. The identification of synergism between a 5-HT(2A)R antagonist plus a 5-HT(2C)R agonist to attenuate these factors important in relapse indicates the promise of a bifunctional ligand as an anti-addiction pharmacotherapeutic, setting the stage to develop new ligands with improved efficacy, potency, selectivity, and in vivo profiles over the individual molecules.

PMID:
23336050
PMCID:
PMC3547488
DOI:
10.1021/cn300072u
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for American Chemical Society Icon for PubMed Central
Loading ...
Support Center