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J Pediatr Psychol. 2013 May;38(4):365-75. doi: 10.1093/jpepsy/jss131. Epub 2013 Jan 17.

Individual and additive effects of mothers' and fathers' chronic pain on health outcomes in young adults with a childhood history of functional abdominal pain.

Author information

1
Department of Psychology and Human Development, Vanderbilt University, USA.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To evaluate effects of mothers' and fathers' chronic pain on health outcomes in adult sons and daughters with a childhood history of functional abdominal pain (FAP).

METHOD:

Adults (n = 319; Mean age = 22.09 years) with a childhood history of FAP reported parental history of chronic pain and their own current health (chronic pain, somatic symptoms, disability, use of medication and health care, illness-related job loss).

RESULTS:

Positive histories of maternal and paternal chronic pain were each associated with poorer health in sons and daughters, regardless of child or parent gender. Having 2 parents with chronic pain was associated with significantly poorer health than having 1 or neither parent with chronic pain.

CONCLUSIONS:

Chronic pain in both mothers and fathers is associated with poor health and elevated health service use in young adults with a childhood history of FAP. Having both parents with chronic pain increases risk for adverse outcomes.

PMID:
23335355
PMCID:
PMC3633252
DOI:
10.1093/jpepsy/jss131
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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