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Clin Auton Res. 2013 Apr;23(2):85-9. doi: 10.1007/s10286-013-0187-9. Epub 2013 Jan 19.

Inhibitory control task is decreased in vascular incontinence patients.

Author information

1
Neurology, Internal Medicine, Sakura Medical Center, Toho University, 564-1 Shimoshizu, Sakura 285-8741, Japan.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

'Vascular incontinence' is a part of elderly incontinence due to cerebral white matter change (WMC). We studied the relationship between performance on several cognitive tasks and urodynamic detrusor overactivity (DO) in patients with vascular incontinence.

METHODS:

We recruited 40 patients with lower urinary tract symptoms due to WMC [20 male, 20 female; mean age 77 years (60-89 years)]. Other neurologic, urologic, and systemic causes of LUT dysfunction were excluded. All patients underwent urodynamics tests and two sets of cognitive tasks, i.e., the Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE) (general cognitive tasks), and the Frontal Assessment Battery (FAB) (frontal lobe tasks).

RESULTS:

The most common urinary symptom was urinary urgency (27 patients), followed by urinary incontinence (26) and nocturnal urinary frequency (25). The urodynamic testing revealed DO in 22 patients. The cognitive testing revealed that the patients' mean MMSE score was 25.8 (range 15-30), and their mean FAB score was 13.6 (4-18). There was no relationship between DO and the total MMSE or FAB score, but our analysis of the relationship between DO and the six subdomains of the FAB (conceptualization, mental flexibility, programming, sensitivity to interference, inhibitory control, and environmental autonomy) revealed a significant relationship between DO and the inhibitory control task (p < 0.005).

CONCLUSIONS:

The results of the present study showed that performance on an inhibitory control task is decreased in vascular incontinence patients with DO.

PMID:
23334165
DOI:
10.1007/s10286-013-0187-9
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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