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Annu Rev Immunol. 2013;31:675-704. doi: 10.1146/annurev-immunol-032712-095946. Epub 2013 Jan 16.

Signaling by the phosphoinositide 3-kinase family in immune cells.

Author information

1
Laboratory of Lymphocyte Signaling and Development, The Babraham Institute, Cambridge, CB22 3AT, United Kingdom. klaus.okkenhaug@babraham.ac.uk

Abstract

Phosphoinositide 3-kinases (PI3Ks) control many important aspects of immune cell development, differentiation, and function. Mammals have eight PI3K catalytic subunits that are divided into three classes based on similarities in structure and function. Specific roles for the class I PI3Ks have been broadly investigated and are relatively well understood, as is the function of their corresponding phosphatases. More recently, specific roles for the class II and class III PI3Ks have emerged. Through vertebrate evolution and in parallel with the evolution of adaptive immunity, there has been a dramatic increase not only in the genes for PI3K subunits but also in genes for phosphatases that act on 3-phosphoinositides and in 3-phosphoinositide-binding proteins. Our understanding of the PI3Ks in immunity is guided by fundamental discoveries made in simpler model organisms as well as by appreciating new adaptations of this signaling module in mammals in general and in immune cells in particular.

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