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Biochem Pharmacol. 2012 Nov 15;84(10):1340-50.

Therapeutic potential of resolvins in the prevention and treatment of inflammatory disorders.

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1
Tumor Microenvironment Global Core Research Center, College of Pharmacy, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-742, South Korea.

Abstract

Acute inflammation, the primary response to harmful infection and injury, can be successfully completed through effective resolution and tissue repair. Resolution of inflammation requires the elimination of key inflammatory cells and the downregulation of pro-inflammatory mediators in the inflamed sites. This coordinated process is actively regulated by biochemical mediators which possess anti-inflammatory and/or pro-resolving effects. Resolvins, endogenous lipid mediators generated from omega-3 fatty acids, have emerged as a novel class of potent molecules that counteract excessive inflammatory responses and stimulate pro-resolving mechanisms; regulating the trafficking of leukocytes and stimulating non-phlogistic phagocytosis of apoptotic neutrophils by macrophages.The disruption of these anti-inflammatory and pro-resolving mechanisms can not only cause the initiation of unnecessary inflammation, but also lead to the persistence of inflammation which contributes to the pathogenesis and progression of chronic inflammatory diseases. Since inflammation can have the beneficial effect on host defense, the timely resolution of inflammation is better to avoid chronic inflammatory situation, rather than merely blocking inflammation at the beginning. In this regards, understanding of the mechanism underlying resolution of inflammation provides a novel therapeutic approach to prevent and treat chronic inflammatory disorders. This review will address therapeutic potential of resolvins for the successful management of inflammatory ailments.

PMID:
23330154
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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