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Sports Med. 2013 Mar;43(3):195-206. doi: 10.1007/s40279-012-0015-8.

Physical activity interventions and depression in children and adolescents : a systematic review and meta-analysis.

Author information

1
School of Human Movement Studies, The University of Queensland, Brisbane, QLD, Australia. h.brown1@uq.edu.au

Abstract

CONTEXT:

Evidence suggests chronic physical activity (PA) participation may be both protective against the onset of and beneficial for reducing depressive symptoms.

OBJECTIVE:

The aim of this article is to assess the impact of PA interventions on depression in children and adolescents using meta-analysis.

DATA SOURCES:

Published English language studies were located from manual and computerized searches of the following databases: PsycInfo, The Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews and The Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, Trials Register of Promoting Health Interventions (TRoPHI; EPPI Centre), Web of Science and MEDLINE.

STUDY SELECTION:

Studies meeting inclusion criteria (1) reported on interventions to promote or increase PA; (2) included children aged 5-11 years and/or adolescents aged 12-19 years; (3) reported on results using a quantitative measure of depression; (4) included a non-physical control or comparison group; and (5) were published in peer-reviewed journals written in English, up to and including May 2011 (when the search was conducted).

DATA EXTRACTION:

Studies were coded for methodological, participant and study characteristics. Comprehensive Meta-Analysis version-2 software was used to compute effect sizes, with subgroup analyses to identify moderating characteristics. Study quality was assessed using the Delphi technique.

RESULTS:

Nine studies were included (n = 581); most were school-based randomized controlled trials, randomized by individual. Studies used a variety of measurement tools to assess depressive symptoms. The summary treatment effect was small but significant (Hedges' g = -0.26, standard error = 0.09, 95% confidence intervals = -0.43, -0.08, p = 0.004). Subgroup analyses showed that methodological (e.g. studies with both education and PA intervention; those with a higher quality score; and less than 3 months in duration) and participant characteristics (e.g. single-gender studies; those targeting overweight or obese groups) contributed most to the reduction in depression.

CONCLUSIONS:

There was a small significant overall effect for PA on depression. More outcome-focused, high-quality trials are required to effectively inform the implementation of programmes to reduce depressive symptoms in children and adolescents.

PMID:
23329611
DOI:
10.1007/s40279-012-0015-8
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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