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J Obes. 2012;2012:708505. doi: 10.1155/2012/708505. Epub 2012 Dec 26.

Influence of weight loss, body composition, and lifestyle behaviors on plasma adipokines: a randomized weight loss trial in older men and women with symptomatic knee osteoarthritis.

Author information

1
Department of Health and Exercise Science, Wake Forest University, Reynolda Station, P.O. Box 7868 Winston-Salem, NC 27109, USA.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To investigate effects of weight loss on adipokines and health measures in obese older adults with symptomatic knee osteoarthritis.

METHODS:

Participants were randomly assigned to either weight loss (WL) (men: 12, women: 14) or weight stable (WS) group (men: 12, women: 13). WL intervention included meal replacements and structured exercise training. Measurements of leptin, adiponectin, soluble leptin receptor, lifestyle behaviors, and body composition were collected at baseline and 6 months. Univariate analysis of covariance was performed on 6 month variables, and Spearman and partial correlations were made between variables.

RESULTS:

Weight loss was 13.0% and 6.7% in WL for men and women, respectively. Women in WL had lower whole body and trunk fat than WS. The leptin : adiponectin ratio was lower for women in WL than WS at 6 months, with no group differences in adipokines for men. Leptin and free leptin index correlated with body fat in both genders at baseline. Interestingly, only women showed reductions in leptin (P < 0.100) and correlations between the percentage change leptin and trunk fat and the percentage changes in free leptin index with total fat and trunk fat. Partial correlations between 6 month adipokines after adjustments for covariates and group/time period show potential multivariate influences.

CONCLUSIONS:

In the presence of an effective weight loss intervention in older obese adults, there are significant relationships between weight and fat loss and leptin in women, but not men, suggesting gender-specific features of adipokine metabolism in this age group.

PMID:
23326650
PMCID:
PMC3541640
DOI:
10.1155/2012/708505
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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