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PLoS One. 2013;8(1):e54035. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0054035. Epub 2013 Jan 11.

Functional neural correlates of attentional deficits in amnestic mild cognitive impairment.

Author information

1
Department of Psychology, Queens College, City University of New York, Flushing, New York, United States of America.

Abstract

Although amnestic mild cognitive impairment (aMCI; often considered a prodromal phase of Alzheimer's disease, AD) is most recognized by its implications for decline in memory function, research suggests that deficits in attention are present early in aMCI and may be predictive of progression to AD. The present study used functional magnetic resonance imaging to examine differences in the brain during the attention network test between 8 individuals with aMCI and 8 neurologically healthy, demographically matched controls. While there were no significant behavioral differences between groups for the alerting and orienting functions, patients with aMCI showed more activity in neural regions typically associated with the networks subserving these functions (e.g., temporoparietal junction and posterior parietal regions, respectively). More importantly, there were both behavioral (i.e., greater conflict effect) and corresponding neural deficits in executive control (e.g., less activation in the prefrontal and anterior cingulate cortices). Although based on a small number of patients, our findings suggest that deficits of attention, especially the executive control of attention, may significantly contribute to the behavioral and cognitive deficits of aMCI.

PMID:
23326568
PMCID:
PMC3543395
DOI:
10.1371/journal.pone.0054035
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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