Format

Send to

Choose Destination
See comment in PubMed Commons below
PLoS One. 2013;8(1):e52551. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0052551. Epub 2013 Jan 9.

Survival of the stillest: predator avoidance in shark embryos.

Author information

1
The Oceans Institute and the School of Animal Biology, The University of Western Australia, Crawley, Western Australia, Australia. ryankempster@supportoursharks.com

Abstract

Sharks use highly sensitive electroreceptors to detect the electric fields emitted by potential prey. However, it is not known whether prey animals are able to modulate their own bioelectrical signals to reduce predation risk. Here, we show that some shark (Chiloscyllium punctatum) embryos can detect predator-mimicking electric fields and respond by ceasing their respiratory gill movements. Despite being confined to the small space within the egg case, where they are vulnerable to predators, embryonic sharks are able to recognise dangerous stimuli and react with an innate avoidance response. Knowledge of such behaviours, may inform the development of effective shark repellents.

PMID:
23326342
PMCID:
PMC3541397
DOI:
10.1371/journal.pone.0052551
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Full text links

    Icon for Public Library of Science Icon for PubMed Central
    Loading ...
    Support Center