Format

Send to

Choose Destination
See comment in PubMed Commons below
J Invest Dermatol. 2013 Jul;133(7):1760-7. doi: 10.1038/jid.2012.480. Epub 2013 Jan 17.

Dependence of deodorant usage on ABCC11 genotype: scope for personalized genetics in personal hygiene.

Author information

1
MRC Centre for Causal Analyses in Translational Epidemiology (CAiTE), and Bristol Genetic Epidemiology Laboratories (BGEL), School of Social and Community Medicine, University of Bristol, Bristol, UK. santi.rodriguez@bristol.ac.uk

Abstract

Earwax type and axillary odor are genetically determined by rs17822931, a single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) located in the ABCC11 gene. The literature has been concerned with the Mendelian trait of earwax, although axillary odor is also Mendelian. Ethnic diversity in rs17822931 exists, with higher frequency of allele A in east Asians. Influence on deodorant usage has not been investigated. In this work, we present a detailed analysis of the rs17822931 effect on deodorant usage in a large (N∼17,000 individuals) population cohort (the Avon Longitudinal Study of Parents and Children (ALSPAC)). We found strong evidence (P=3.7 × 10(-20)) indicating differential deodorant usage according to the rs17822931 genotype. AA homozygotes were almost 5-fold overrepresented in categories of never using deodorant or using it infrequently. However, 77.8% of white European genotypically nonodorous individuals still used deodorant, and 4.7% genotypically odorous individuals did not. We provide evidence of a behavioral effect associated with rs17822931. This effect has a biological basis that can result in a change in the family's environment if an aerosol deodorant is used. It also indicates potential cost saving to the nonodorous and scope for personalized genetics usage in personal hygiene choices, with consequent reduction of inappropriate chemical exposures for some.

Comment in

PMID:
23325016
PMCID:
PMC3674910
DOI:
10.1038/jid.2012.480
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Full text links

    Icon for Elsevier Science Icon for PubMed Central
    Loading ...
    Support Center