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PLoS One. 2013;8(1):e53997. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0053997. Epub 2013 Jan 8.

Presence of a polymicrobial endometrial biofilm in patients with bacterial vaginosis.

Author information

1
Charité Hospital, CCM, Laboratory for Molecular Genetics, Polymicrobial Infections and Bacterial Biofilms and Department of Medicine, Gastroenterology, Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Berlin, Germany.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To assess whether the bacterial vaginosis biofilm extends into the upper female genital tract.

STUDY DESIGN:

Endometrial samples obtained during curettage and fallopian tube samples obtained during salpingectomy were collected. Endometrial and fallopian tube samples were analyzed for the presence of bacteria with fluorescence-in-situ-hybridisation (FISH) analysis with probes targeting bacterial vaginosis-associated and other bacteria.

RESULTS:

A structured polymicrobial Gardnerella vaginalis biofilm could be detected in part of the endometrial and fallopian tube specimens. Women with bacterial vaginosis had a 50.0% (95% CI 24.0-76.0) risk of presenting with an endometrial Gardnerella vaginalis biofilm. Pregnancy (AOR  = 41.5, 95% CI 5.0-341.9, p<0.001) and the presence of bacterial vaginosis (AOR  = 23.2, 95% CI 2.6-205.9, p<0.001) were highly predictive of the presence of uterine or fallopian bacterial colonisation when compared to non-pregnant women without bacterial vaginosis.

CONCLUSION:

Bacterial vaginosis is frequently associated with the presence of a structured polymicrobial Gardnerella vaginalis biofilm attached to the endometrium. This may have major implications for our understanding of the pathogenesis of adverse pregnancy outcome in association with bacterial vaginosis.

PMID:
23320114
PMCID:
PMC3540019
DOI:
10.1371/journal.pone.0053997
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
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