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J Am Coll Surg. 2013 Mar;216(3):353-62. doi: 10.1016/j.jamcollsurg.2012.11.011. Epub 2013 Jan 11.

Strategies for successful left-lobe living donor liver transplantation in 250 consecutive adult cases in a single center.

Author information

1
Department of Surgery and Science, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Kyushu University, Fukuoka, Japan. tikesurg@yahoo.co.jp

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Living donor liver transplantation (LDLT) using left-lobe grafts was not generally recognized as feasible due to the problem of graft size.

STUDY DESIGN:

We retrospectively evaluated strategies for successful left-lobe LDLT in 250 consecutive cases stratified into 2 eras: Era 1 (n = 121), in which surgical procedures were continually refined, and Era 2 (n = 129), in which established procedures were used.

RESULTS:

Graft volume (GV) did not affect the incidence of graft function or survival. Era 2 patients had decreased portal vein (PV) pressure at closure (16.0 ± 3.5 mmHg vs 19.1 ± 4.6 mmHg, p < 0.01), increased PV flow/GV (301 ± 125 mL/min/100g vs 391 ± 142 mL/min/100g, p < 0.01), and improved graft survival rate (1-year: 90.6% vs 81.8%. p < 0.01) despite the smaller GV/standard volume (SLV) ratio (36.2% ± 5.2% vs 41.2% ± 8.8%, p < 0.01) compared with Era 1. Patients in Era 2 had lower PV pressure and greater PV flow (y = 598-5.7 x, p = 0.02) at any GV/SLV compared with cases in Era 1 (y = 480-4.3 x, p < 0.01), representing greater graft compliance. Univariate analysis for graft survival showed that Era 1, Model for End-Stage Liver Disease (MELD) score ≥ 20, inpatient status, closing portal venous pressure ≥ 20 mmHg, no splenectomy, and operative blood loss ≥ 10 L were the risk factors for graft loss, and multivariate analysis showed that Era 1 was the only significant factor (p < 0.01). During Era 2, development of primary graft dysfunction was associated with inpatient recipient status (p = 0.02) and donor age ≥ 45 years (p < 0.01).

CONCLUSIONS:

The outcomes of left-lobe LDLT were improved by accumulated experience and technical developments.

[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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