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JSLS. 2012 Jul-Sep;16(3):413-20. doi: 10.4293/108680812X13462882735854.

Safety of culdotomy as a surgical approach: implications for natural orifice transluminal endoscopic surgery.

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1
Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN, USA.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To evaluate the efficacy and safety of culdotomy as a surgical approach to access the peritoneal cavity and discuss its implications for natural orifice transluminal endoscopic surgery (NOTES).

METHODS:

A retrospective chart review of women undergoing culdotomy for tubal sterilization (N 219) between January 1995 and December 2005 was performed. The Accordion Grading System was used for the severity of complications.

RESULTS:

No intraoperative complications were noted. Postoperative complications occurred in 7 patients (3.2%): 6 infections (grade 2) and 1 case of hemorrhage (grade 3). Conversion to laparoscopy was necessary in 10 patients (2.2%) due to anatomical constraints or pelvic adhesions; however, culdotomy with entry into the abdominal cavity was nevertheless successful in all 10 cases. The difference in the proportion with a history of pelvic surgery between the conversion and nonconversion groups was not statistically significant (P = .068). Patients with BMI ≥30 had a higher conversion rate compared to patients with BMI <30 (11.4% versus 1.5%, P = .011). Tubal sterilization via culdotomy was successfully performed in all 11 women with no prior vaginal deliveries.

CONCLUSION:

Culdotomy appears to be a safe surgical approach to access the peritoneal cavity and is associated with a low complication rate. These data support the feasibility and safety of utilizing the cul-de-sac as an access portal for natural orifice transluminal endoscopic surgery.

PMID:
23318067
PMCID:
PMC3535790
DOI:
10.4293/108680812X13462882735854
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
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