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J Plant Physiol. 2013 Mar 15;170(5):534-8. doi: 10.1016/j.jplph.2012.11.006. Epub 2013 Jan 11.

Exposure to Cr(VI) induces organ dependent MSI in two loci related with photophosphorylation and with glutamine metabolism.

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1
Laboratory of Biotechnology and Cytometry, Centre for Environmental and Marine Studies (CESAM) & Department Biology, University Aveiro, 3810-193 Aveiro, Portugal.

Abstract

Chromium (Cr), as a mutagenic agent in plants, has received less attention than other metal pollutants. To understand if Cr induces microsatellite instability (MSI), Pisum sativum seedlings were exposed for 28 days to different concentrations of Cr(VI) up to 2000mgL(-1), and the genetic instability of ten microsatellites (SSRs) was analyzed. In plants exposed to Cr(VI) up to 1000mg L(-1), MSI was never observed. However, roots exposed to 2000mgL(-1) displayed MSI in two of the loci analyzed, corresponding to a mutation rate of 8.3%. SSR2 (inserted in the locus for plastid photosystem I 24kDa light harvesting protein) and SSR6 (inserted in the locus for P. sativum glutamine synthetase) from Cr(VI)-treated roots presented alleles with, respectively, less 6bp and more 3bp than the corresponding controls. This report demonstrates that: (a) SSRs technique is sensitive to detect Cr-induced mutagenicity in plants, being Cr-induced-MSI dose and organ dependent (roots are more sensitive); (b) two Cr-sensitive loci are related with thylakoid photophosphorylation and with glutamine synthetase, respectively; (c) despite MSI is induced by Cr(VI), it only occurs in plants exposed to concentrations higher than 1000mgL(-1) (values rarely found in real scenarios). Considering these data, we also discuss the known functional changes induced by Cr(VI) in photosynthesis and in glutamine synthetase activity.

PMID:
23317936
DOI:
10.1016/j.jplph.2012.11.006
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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